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FRONTIER MOMENT: Boldens Run 1840-43, Ch 1: CROSSING-PLACE

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FRONTIER MOMENT - Boldens Run 1840-43

Chapter One:  CROSSING-PLACE

In August 1840 Bolden Brothers brought their herd of cattle to a halt on the eastern bank of the Hopkins River. It was probably raining. But they were finally 'Here'. And they had found a relatively safe place to make tomorrow's crossing.

 North of the river's junction with Mount Emu Creek, the water ran too swift and deep, pressed narrow by steep sides. And at Hopkins Falls, a wide but uneven plateau of basalt rock, the winter rains and strong flow could prove fatal for stumbling livestock. But south of the junction and below the Falls, the river follows a long straight before being forced sharply left by a projection of ancient limestone. It was here that the river slowed, dropping some of its silt-load of sand and gravel midstream. To the brothers, experienced overlanders who had successfully staged their mob of one thousand head through the swollen floodwaters of the Murray and Ovens Rivers, this bend …

First Wave: Appendix A: List of Ships

FIRST WAVE: BOUNTY EMIGRANTS TO PORT PHILLIP 1839-1845

Appendix A:  Ships List
List of Ships with Bounty Emigrants that arrived at Port Phillip from 1839 to 1845

1839
Ship                           Departure         Arrival    Consignor            Deaths      Emigrants
David Clarke              Glasgow            29 Oct     Government               1                230
William Metcalfe         Plymouth          24 Nov     Marshall (Lond)         11                166
Palmyra                      Glasgow           24 Nov     Gilchrist (Syd)            4                  47
Westminster               London             13 Dec      Marshall (Lond)        10                157 

1840
Ship                           Departure         Arrival     Consignor             Deaths     Emigrants
John Bull                    London              21 Jan      Marshall (Lond)             4                221
Glen Huntly                Oban/Glasgow   17 Apr     Government                  26              153
China     …

A Grandfather's Tale: Chapter 10, MERCHANT DECEASED

A GRANDFATHER'S TALE: LIVERPOOL SLAVE MERCHANT WILLIAM BOLDEN 1730-1800


Chapter Ten:  MERCHANT DECEASED

A hard man, my father. A Lancashire man. No fool.
When Uncle Edward died in 1750, my mother expected us to move back to the Ellel farm. Father would have none of it. He scorned grandfather Edward, and great-grandfather Edward before him. They were "soft in t' heed" for grafting hard all their lives and nothing to show for it at the end. Only a couple of skinny cows "'n brokit spade".
The Ellel tenancy was not really a farm at all in father's mind. Just a lifetime of unrewarding toil that was passed on to the next of kin. A poor thing, of mud and muck and rotten mortar. 
He was William Bolden, Freeman and Master Tanner of the Borough of Lancaster. He had made something of himself and he wasn't about to go backwards.

Father stayed silent before my mother's chatter for weeks. Finally, when he'd had enough of her asking, he spoke his mind.

"…

A Grandfather's Tale: Chapter 9, THE GRAVEYARD

A GRANDFATHER'S TALE: LIVERPOOL SLAVE MERCHANT WILLIAM BOLDEN 1730-1800


Chapter Nine: THE GRAVEYARD

William Bolden's last decade was spent in withdrawing from the business partnership of Sparling and Bolden. It was a period of realising his assets and planning their destination after his death. Overshadowing this was depression. Not the economic recession of the early 1790s, but his own mental health.

The partners' last letter book, the subject of MM Schofield's invaluable study in 1964, is the best available source for describing this difficult time for the old merchant. Schofield writes that in 1793 "William Bolden decided to retire". In a letter dated 10 October 1797, John Lawrence received final notice "to close down the [Virginian] business as soon as possible". (1)

It is in another of those letters, dated 22 July 1793, that the extent of Bolden's personal struggle becomes apparent. Sparling in Liverpool writes to Lawrence in Virginia that,
...i…